Noise Part II

Part One here: https://frozenotterblog.wordpress.com/2013/05/12/noise/

Some days I can’t help but think back to something I learned in an AP Psychology class I took a year or two ago (depending on how you count it). It was about the learning and language development of babies. Apparently it was very detrimental to raise the baby with a fan constantly running in the background because eventually the baby got used to this background noise. Once that happened, it would need that background noise to be able to learn things and to develop proper language skills. The environment without the fan noise would be too quiet for it to think and concentrate.

As the baby would grow older, it would continue to seek out or create environments in which to live that included background noise so it could concentrate (like a child turning on the radio or television, a teenager with ear buds or headphones constantly on, or an adult doing any of these things or moving to a noisy city). The person could only concentrate adequately and learn best with this background noise, and unwillingness to give it up over the years would only make the dependency worse.

At this point the child cannot concentrate well enough to learn much at home or in school and the adolescent or adult cannot focus on mental tasks at work. The person may be punished or scolded for being “spacy” and getting bad scores on tests or for not doing very well at work. This will continue for as long as the person is connected to their way of living. Modern technology makes this all too easy. This is just one example of why moderation is so important: dependency on excess is detrimental to one’s ability to live a normal and healthy life. But I digress.

If someone is going to be dependent on listening to music all the time, they could at least listen to something good instead of the kinds of things I mentioned in the article I linked to at the beginning of this post. (Burzum’s “Rundgang Um Die Transzendentale Saule Der Singularitat” is a good example of something nice they could listen to instead. It’s good thinking music.)

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